The "Hot Pockets Heiress" Faces 21 Months In Prison In Relation To The College Admissions Scandal

Kristin Salaky
Photo credit: Boston Globe - Getty Images

From Delish

A member of the family behind the company that created Hot Pockets is due to be sentenced Tuesday in relation to the highly publicized college admissions scandal.

Michelle Janavs, who pleaded guilty in October, is facing 21 months in prison for her involvement in a scheme to get her daughters into prestigious universities, according to Fox Business. She is one of 53 people charged but has been called among the "most culpable parents" involved in the scandal.

She admitted paying $100,000 to William “Rick” Singer, the man at the heart of the scheme, to have a someone amend one daughter's ACT exam. She also admitted to having paid $200,000 for one of daughters to be identified as a beach volleyball recruit for the University of Southern California.

Janavs also faces a charge of money laundering conspiracy—unlike many of the other people involved—because of her initial reluctance to plead guilty.

She has since apologized for her actions via her lawyers in a statement obtained by Reuters, saying that she "caused harm to other students who have worked so hard to apply and gain admission in a fair fashion.”

“The fallout from Michelle’s actions stand as a beacon to others that illegal shortcuts are a recipe for disaster, regardless of the punishment the court imposes on Michelle,” the statements continued, according to the New York Post.

While she has been dubbed the "Hot Pocket Heiress" by many outlets, she is a former executive at Chef America Inc., a food company that created Hot Pockets in 1983, and was co-founded by her father. Hot Pockets was sold to Nestle SA in 2002 for $2.6 billion, according to Reuters.

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