Do I need a new passport? The ways Brexit could affect you

James Morris
Senior news reporter, Yahoo News UK
Passports and holidays: Does Brexit affect you?

After Britain has left the EU, not much is going to change immediately.

Key EU principles, like freedom of movement and membership of the single market, will still apply during the 11-month transition period.

That’s the political perspective, though. How will Brexit affect people in their day-to-day lives during and after the transition period?

From passports to pensions, Yahoo News UK takes you through everything you need to know.

Will I have to get a new passport?

No. Valid passports can still be used as normal during the transition period.

However, from January 1 next year, after the transition period has ended, your passport will need to have at least six months left and be less than 10 years old. Otherwise, you may not be able to travel to most EU countries.

For more information, visit the government’s transition period advice website HERE.

Will I need a visa for EU holidays?

No. People can visit EU member states as normal during and after the transition period.

This means you’ll be able to stay for up to 90 days in any 180-day period.

For more information, visit the government’s transition period advice website HERE.

Will I have to wait for longer in airport queues?

Not necessarily. The UK government has said airport security procedures will not change for direct flights to and from the UK.

Meanwhile, you’ll still be able to use EU/EEA passport gates until at least December 31.

A file image of people at an EU arrivals gate at Stansted Airport (Yui Mok/PA)

For more information, visit the government’s transition period advice website HERE.

Will my European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) still apply?

During the transition period? Yes.

After the transition period? Probably not, the government has said.

This means it will be particularly important to get travel insurance with the right cover if you have a pre-existing condition - as the EHIC covers this.

For more information, visit the government’s transition period advice website HERE.

Should I buy my holiday Euros now?

It’s hard to say. But be aware that the weaker the Pound, the more expensive your holiday. So monitor exchange rates.

Will holidays become more expensive?

Unlikely. As the Holiday Extras website points out: “Inflation in most of the major holiday destinations in Europe has been negligible since the 2016 referendum (and prices have even fallen a bit over the last five years in Greece) so the Euros you do take with you should go just as far as you remember.”

Will mobile roaming still be free?

During the transition period? Yes. After the transition period? Possibly not. It depends on the UK government’s future relationship negotiations with the EU.

From January 1 next year, you should check with your phone operator. Even so, a new law means you’ll be protected from getting mobile data charges above £45 without you knowing.

For more information, visit the government’s transition period advice website HERE.

What about my pet?

UK citizens’ pets will be unaffected by Brexit day on January 31. The current government advice is: “You can travel with your pet to the EU under the current pet travel rules using your current UK-issued EU pet passport.

“If you’re travelling with your pet for the first time you’ll have to visit your vet to get a pet passport.”

What happens further down the line is a little more unclear. On January 1 next year, the UK will become a third country. Third countries can apply to the European Commission to be listed.

In the EU Pet Travel Scheme, there are three categorisations of third country: unlisted, Part 1 listed, and Part 2 listed. You can read more about this on the UK government website.

Will it affect my pension?

Unlikely. The Money Advice Service said anyone with a UK pension, having worked for UK employers, should not expect any changes.

Watch: How four years of utter Brexit chaos unfolded