Lizzo on why she's moved away from the body positivity movement

Jennifer Savin
·2-min read
Photo credit: David Crotty - Getty Images
Photo credit: David Crotty - Getty Images

From Cosmopolitan

Singer Lizzo, who, as you'll likely already know, is just as famed for being a plus-size, powerhouse queen who oozes self-love as she is for her music, has candidly shared her feelings on the body positivity movement. She said she's now moving away from the term and instead prefers to focus on being 'body normative' instead.

The term 'body positivity' has been around for several years now, and was started by women who didn't feel their larger bodies were represented, or respected, online or in mainstream media. Since it's birth over five years ago, Lizzo notes that the movement has become white-washed. "[The hashtag is filled with] smaller-framed girls, curvier girls [and a] lotta white girls," she said during a new interview with Vogue, adding: "I feel no ways about that, because inclusivity is what my message is always about. I’m glad that this conversation is being included in the mainstream narrative."

She continued on to explain, "What I don’t like is how the people that this term was created for are not benefiting from it. Girls with back fat, girls with bellies that hang, girls with thighs that aren’t separated, that overlap. Girls with stretch marks. You know, girls who are in the 18-plus club. They need to be benefiting from... the mainstream effect of body positivity now. But with everything that goes mainstream, it gets changed. It gets, you know, it gets made acceptable."

Further expanding on her decision to move away from the term body positivity, Lizzo shared a photo from the shoot and added a quote into the caption: "'I think it’s lazy for me to just say I’m body positive at this point,' Lizzo says. 'It’s easy. I would like to be body-normative. I want to normalize my body. And not just be like, "Ooh, look at this cool movement. Being fat is body positive." No, being fat is normal. I think now, I owe it to the people who started this to not just stop here. We have to make people uncomfortable again, so that we can continue to change. Change is always uncomfortable, right?'."

We love that she's continuing to keep it real and discuss how movements like this can and do change, evolve and spark new ones – and we're also fully on board with normalising all body types. End of.

Like this article? Sign up to our newsletter to get more articles like this delivered straight to your inbox.

SIGN UP


You Might Also Like