Mickey Rourke brands Tom Cruise 'irrelevant'

·2-min read


Mickey Rourke has branded Tom Cruise "irrelevant".
The 69-year-old star accused the 'Mission: Impossible' daredevil of doing "the same effing part" in his movies for decades and insisted he has no "respect" for the actor because he doesn't challenge himself.
Asked how he felt to see Tom top the box office charts with 'Top Gun: Maverick', he said: "That doesn't mean s*** to me.
“The guy’s been doing the same effing part for 35 years. I got no respect for that.
“I don’t care about money and power. I care about when I watch Al Pacino work and Chris Walken and De Niro’s early work and Richard Harris’s work and Ray Winstone’s work. That’s the kind of actor I want to be like. Monty Clift and Brando back in the day. The kind of guys who tried to stretch as actors."
Asked by TalkTV host Piers Morgan if he doesn't think Tom is a good actor, he replied: “I think he’s irrelevant, in my world."
Elsewhere in the interview, which aired on Monday (11.07.22), the 'Wrestler' star admitted he had been having therapy for 23 years to tackle the "shame" he felt over his abusive childhood.
He said: "I came from a very shameful upbringing and it was very violent, and very physically abusive and mentally.
"When I left home, like 14 or 15… I was so happy that the physical pain was over, because that was horrifying but I didn’t realise it was going to f*** me up in my head and my way of dealing with people."
Mickey began to "alienate" those around him and was "living in shame", resulting in him "getting hard" to survive.
He said: "There comes a time and it happened when I was about 14 and when you are living in shame there is nothing worse. You have two choices – you either live in shame, and you become a broken soul or person, or you get hard.
"I chose to get hard not by choice but by survival."

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