The One Problem With 'Star Trek: Discovery'

Bill Bradley

In many respects, “Star Trek: Discovery,” which finally premiered on CBS Sunday, goes where no version of the story has gone before. But while the show’s content is out of this world, the network’s business plan might be going a bit too far. 

Sonequa Martin-Green, the first black woman to lead a “Star Trek” series, shines as First Officer Michael Burnham, a human raised on Vulcan by Spock’s parents.

In the premiere episode, Burnham’s struggle to balance logic and emotions is on full display, leading her to commit a mutiny on her ship by attacking one of her own, Capt. Philippa Georgiou (Michelle Yeoh). Burnham does this in an attempt to get her crew to strike a Klingon vessel before the mysterious ship can attack, but her plan fails and the Klingons call to unite their 24 houses.

Now, a war has begun. 

The pilot episode has a lot to love. Martin-Green’s performance earned well-deserved applause ...

... And the show quickly establishes that it’s not afraid to take on larger topics of discussion, showing Klingons as a species concerned with racial purity and dropping lines like:

Like many pilots, though, “Star Trek: Discovery” is a slow burn, taking its time to set up an expansive story and world. Unlike many, it’s asking people to follow it to a completely different platform to see what happens next.

The premiere episode of “Star Trek: Discovery” aired on CBS, but the second was released on CBS’s streaming platform, CBS All Access. Subsequent episodes will debut weekly on All Access. (Internationally, the show will reportedly stream weekly on Netflix.)

Obviously, some peeps are not pleased:

It’s a bold move by CBS to get fans to subscribe to their streaming platform.

With everyone already paying for other services like Netflix, Hulu and HBO Now, the question moving forward will be if “Star Trek” fans will go where they’ve never gone before. 

  • This article originally appeared on HuffPost.