Raven-Symone calls for better mental health focus in wake of Aaron Carter's death


Raven-Symone thinks Aaron Carter's death shines a light on the importance of prioritising mental health.
The former Disney Channel star spoke out following the death of the 'I Want Candy' singer - who was found dead aged 34 over the weekend due to as-yet unknown causes - and insisted mental check-ups should be normalised for the good of society.
Discussing the death of Aaron, who had spoken publicly of his struggles with addiction, as well as multiple personality disorder, schizophrenia, acute anxiety and bipolar disorder, she said: "I think we really do need to get the world in order, so we can start focusing on mental health. It's a real thing, and we need to stop losing our youth to it. Maybe one day people will get the hint.
"It's just a part of our everyday life to have check ups, mentally, and help our society out."
The 36-year-old star - who is married to Miranda Pearman-Maday - branded Aaron's untimely death "a tragedy".
She told 'Entertainment Tonight': "We're sending our love out to the family.
"We crossed circles multiple times within the music industry. My heart goes out to Nick [Carter, Aaron's brother]. It's such a tragedy."
Police found Aaron unresponsive in his bath at his home in Lancaster, California, on Saturday (05.11.22).
It was later revealed a woman who found Aaron’s body was house-sitting for the singer and police received a 911 call before they discovered the ‘Crazy Little Party Girl’ singer dead.
A representative for the pop star confirmed the death in a statement on Saturday, saying: “It is with great regret to confirm Aaron Carter was found unresponsive this AM in his home in Palmdale, CA.
“The family has been notified and will be flying out to Los Angeles. Aaron worked very hard towards the end of his life in recovery, to be a good father and to make amends with his family.”
Homicide detectives were called to the scene of Aaron’s death, but it is understood their presence was part of standard procedure, with no signs of foul play detected.