Top Republican Liz Cheney and Other GOP Reps Say They Will Vote to Impeach Trump

Ashley Boucher
·3-min read

Tom Williams/getty Liz Cheney

Multiple Republican members of Congress are backing House Democrats in their resolution for the impeachment of President Donald Trump.

Reps. Liz Cheney, John Katko and Adam Kinzinger all issued statements Tuesday saying that they will vote in favor of impeachment when the House votes on Wednesday.

"Much more will become clear in coming days and weeks, but what we know now is enough," said Cheney, 54, a Wyoming lawmaker who is the chair of the House Republican Conference. "The President of the United States summoned this mob, assembled the mob, and lit the flame of this attack. Everything that followed was his doing. None of this would have happened without the President."

"The President could have immediately and forcefully intervened to stop the violence. He did not. There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution," she continued. "I will vote to impeach the President."

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Like Cheney, both Katko, of New York, and Illinois' Kinzinger said that there is enough evidence to impeach Trump, who was charged with "incitement of insurrection" in the article of impeachment that was formally introduced on Monday.

"It cannot be ignored that President Trump encouraged this insurrection – both on social media ahead of January 6th, and in his speech that day," Katko, ranking member of the House Committee on Homeland Security, said in his statement, before adding that the prospect of allowing "the President of the United States to incite this attack without consequence is a direct threat to the future of our democracy. For that reason, I cannot sit by without taking action. I will vote to impeach this President."

zach D Roberts/Getty Images John Katko

Ismail Hakki Demir/Getty Images Adam Kinzinger

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"There is no doubt in my mind that the President of the United States broke his oath of office and incited this insurrection," Kinzinger said in his statement Tuesday.

"He used his position in the Executive to attack the Legislative. So in assessing the articles of impeachment brought before the House, I must consider: if these actions--the Article II branch inciting a deadly insurrection against the Article I branch--are not worthy of impeachment, then what is an impeachable offense?" Kinzinger said. "I will vote in favor of impeachment."

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell reportedly supports the impeachment effort, sources told the New York Times Tuesday. CNN similarly reported that sources said McConnell "hates" Trump for his response to the failed insurrection attempt last Wednesday, which left five people dead and dozens injured.

A spokesperson for McConnell did not immediately respond to PEOPLE's request for comment.

TOM BRENNER/POOL/AFP via Getty Sen. Mitch McConnell

RELATED: Trump Doesn't Accept Responsibility for Inciting Capitol Riots, Says Speech Was 'Totally Appropriate'

While some House Republicans are supporting impeachment, others introduced Tuesday a resolution to censure Trump "for trying to unlawfully overturn the 2020 Presidential election and violating his oath of office on January 6, 2021."

Reps. Tom Reed (NY-23), Young Kim (CA-39), Fred Upton (MI-06), Mike Gallagher (WI-08), John Curtis (UT-03) and Peter Meijer (MI-03) introduced the resolution, led by Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick (R-PA).

The group is arguing that "the House's impeachment efforts will almost certainly result in a second acquittal of President Trump, which would even further divide and inflame tensions in our nation" and would "undermine President-elect Biden's ability to govern effectively at the beginning and most critical time of his presidency."

Meanwhile, Trump has refused to accept responsibility for inciting the attempted coup, saying Tuesday that his speech to a group of supporters — in which he told them to march to the Capitol and "fight like hell" — was "totally appropriate."