Lynn's busted shoulder creates $1.86m headache

Michael Ramsey

David Warner admits he's unsure whether Chris Lynn will get to translate his Twenty20 brilliance to longer forms of the game after suffering yet another injury setback.

The powerful batsman's rotten injury run continued on Wednesday when he dislocated his shoulder during Australia's T20 tri-series final victory over New Zealand.

Lynn left the ground in the hands of trainers midway through New Zealand's innings at Eden Park after diving in the field and landing awkwardly on his right shoulder.

It comes after Lynn had his left shoulder reconstructed last year, having also struggled with calf and hamstring issues.

The Queenslander has avoided major bone injury but will be held back from playing in the Pakistan Super League (PSL), instead returning to Brisbane for further scans.

"I'm disappointed to not go to the Pakistan Super League as planned but I'll now focus on rehabilitation and working as hard as I can, with the hope to still take part in the Indian Premier League (IPL) later this year," said Lynn, who was picked up by Kolkata Knight Riders for AU$1.86m in the recent IPL auction.

Chris Lynn. Pic: Getty

One of the most dominant batsmen in T20 cricket when fit, Lynn was forced to pull out of Australia's recent one-day international series against England with a calf injury.

Stand-in T20 captain Warner was uncertain when asked whether he thought the 27-year-old could manage a sustained run in longer-form cricket.

"That is something for him to assess with the medical staff, it is up to the individual at the end of the day," Warner said.

"You've seen it time and time again with people who have injuries at the wrong time, and if they keep getting the same injuries over and over again, they generally pull the pin on something.

"And with him, he is hungry and he is determined to keep coming back and performing. Every time he does come back, he performs. That's the great thing about Lynny."

Lynn's ongoing recovery from his shoulder reconstruction prompted him to pass up a state contract this summer with Queensland.

His attempts to protect his troublesome left shoulder might well have played a part in his latest setback.

"If you talk to him, he sort of says he tries to favour the other side because he is worried about that shoulder," Warner said.

"At the end of the day, he knows he has got to do his best and try and throw himself around to try and stop runs. So it was just a misfortune for him."