Bizarre 166 litre discovery in backyard: 'Demon eggs'

·News Reporter
·2-min read

A homeowner has got the shock of their life during a backyard excavation.

A man, who appears to be from the US, says his friend made a strange discovery while doing some extensive work in his garden.

A digger operator called in to help prepare for concrete to be laid was stunned when he suddenly struck a 166 litre steel drum, he explained on Facebook.

An accompanying image shows the large drum split in half with hundreds of small white balls spilled all over the grass.

Despite people's suggestions that the round objects are "demon eggs" or "snake eggs", the man revealed they are golf balls, calling the incident "weird".

The 166 litre steel drum with golf balls inside.
A 166 litre steel drum was found buried in a homeowner's yard. Source: Facebook

Confused as to why hundreds of golf balls would be buried in the ground, one Facebook user suggested that the drum may have been used to practise putting skills.

Numerous others said the drum may have been a septic tank or drainage system.

“I had a construction worker find a 44 gallon (166 litre) in my yard too,” one person wrote.

“It was two inches below the surface and the rusted lid had holes drilled into it.

“They think it was to draw water away from the house’s foundation.”

While the post has received more than 1,400 reactions and plenty of theories, many people were also quick to point out that vintage golf balls could be worth something.

At least, at the driving range.

“Wash them, put them in egg cartons and sit in the parking lot of a local golf course,” someone said.

“Boom, five bucks a dozen.”

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