Heartbreaking letter from Michael Schumacher's wife emerges

Michael Schumacher’s wife has given a rare update on his condition in a heartbreaking letter that’s recently come to light.

The Formula 1 legend’s family have been highly private since his skiing accident in 2013, which left him with devastating head injuries.

EXPLAINER: Everything we know about Michael Schumacher’s condition

Public updates have been few and far between since then, but a letter from Corrina Schumacher in which she describes her husband as a ‘fighter’ has now emerged.

According to The Sun, Corrina wrote the letter to German musician Sascha Herchenbach, after he sent the family a recording of a song he’d written for Schumacher.

Michael Schumacher and wife Corrina in 2004. (Photo by Getty Images)

“I would like to sincerely thank you for your message and nice gift that will help us through this difficult time,” the letter reportedly said.

“It is good to receive so many kind wishes and other well-intentioned words – which is a great support for our family.

“We all know Michael is a fighter and will not give up.”

Herchenbach recently revealed the contents of the letter to German magazine Bunte.

Michael Schumacher in 2009. (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)

He says he composed the track ‘Born to Fight’ in the months after Schumacher’s accident.

“I had not expected to get an answer and was overwhelmed,” he said.

“The letter was handwritten and signed by Corinna on her stationery.

“She wrote that she was very thankful for the gift and helped her and her family over this difficult time.”

What happened to Schumacher?

Schumacher was skiing with son Mick in the French Alps on the 29th December, 2013 when he fell and hit his head on a rock.

Doctors said he most likely would have died if not for the helmet he was wearing.

Schumacher was placed in a medically induced coma with a traumatic brain injury, before being moved to a rehabilitation ward about six months later after regaining consciousness.

Michael and Corrina Schumacher in 2005. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

He was then transferred to the University Hospital in Lausanne, Switzerland, before being moved back to his home near Lake Geneva in September 2014.

In November 2014, it was revealed that the 49-year-old was “paralysed and in a wheelchair”, and he “cannot speak and has memory problems.”

“Considering the severe head injuries he suffered, progress has been made in the past weeks and months,” a family statement said at the time.

“There is still, however, a long and difficult road ahead.”

Will he ever recover?

Earlier in 2018, Professor Mark Oberman from the Centre for Neurology of the Asklepios Clinic offered hope.

“According to a Swedish study, between 30 and 40 percent of patients have regained consciousness within four years,” he said.

“Many can come back to life and see how their children and grandchildren grow up, what plans they have or what else happens in the family or circle of friends.”

In November 2016, family friend Ross Brawn revealed that family are still hoping they will see Schumacher “as we knew him”.

“We go see him and hope and pray that one day he will make a recovery,” he said.