'Made-Up' Baby Names Are Popular Among New Parents, Survey Finds — See the Most Unique Monikers

Benjamin VanHoose
'Made-Up' Baby Names Are Popular Among New Parents, Survey Finds — See the Most Unique Monikers

Parents are finding new ways to give their one-of-a-kind bundles of joy equally unique names.

According to survey results posted on channelmum.com earlier this month, moms and dads are getting creative when it comes to naming their babies, opting for “made-up” names in a growing trend.

The report found that about one-third of parents surveyed said they believed the atypical names would “make their child feel special.”

“Shakespeare invented many names that have stood the test of time, like Imogen and Jessica,” S.J. Strum, a spokesperson from the parenting website, said in a statement.

“Now the social media boom means we are all writers and publishers, so parents are making up baby names that give their child a unique start in life,” Strum added.

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Babies playing together

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Strum hand-picked some of the U.K. website’s favorite names from its 1,772 survey participants, including Maevery and Elisobelle for a girl, and Albion and Wrenlow for a boy.

Other top male names included Jaspin, Charleston, Brigham, Ranger, Eastley, Graylen, Tovin and Cedar. As for females, popular pics included Faelina, Idalia, Evabeth, Tessadora, Anaveah, Jessalie, Sylvalie and Sophiel.

The survey also found that of the polled parents, two-thirds said they would consider the invented name route, and a total of 7 percent said they’d already done the deed.

Baby playing with laptop | Getty

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It’s not new for parents to label their little ones with unusual or distinct monikers, though the creative names can sometimes cause headline-making confusion.

For example, in 2018, one mom boarding a flight with her 5-year-old daughter Abcde took issue when an employee reportedly poked fun at the child’s name, which is pronounced “Ab-city.”

“The gate agent started mocking my child’s name, laughing, pointing at me and my daughter and talking to other employees,” the mom told KABC at the time. “So I turned around and just said, ‘Hey, I can hear you, so if I can hear you, my daughter can too. I’d appreciate it if you’d just stop.’ “

Little Abcde didn’t understand why she was the subject of the joke, her mother recalled: “She asked me, ‘Mom, why is she laughing at my name?’ And I said, ‘You know, honey, not everybody is nice and not everyone is going to be nice, and it’s unfortunate.’ “