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Quick-thinking pilot delivers baby mid-flight en route to Thailand

Jakarin Sararnrakskul (Jakarin Sararnrakskul/Instagram)
Jakarin Sararnrakskul (Jakarin Sararnrakskul/Instagram)

A quick-thinking pilot en route to Thailand delivered a baby mid-flight after the mother suddenly went into labour.

Jakarin Sararnrakskul was piloting a VietJet plane from Taipei, Taiwan, to Bangkok, Thailand, when the cabin crew raised the alarm.

He helped deliver the baby after the woman went into labour in one of the plane’s toilets.

He said in a post on Instagram, showing himself holding the baby: “I have been a pilot for 18 years. I just helped a newborn baby on the plane.”

The father-of-one said the crew nicknamed the child "Sky Baby".

According to a 2020 study, published by the International Society of Travel Medicine, 74 children were born on commercial flights between 1929 and 2018, reported Sky News.

All but three survived, the study said.

The NHS advises that most women can travel safely while pregnant, but also advises expectant mothers to check with their midwife or doctor before they fly.

The chance of going into labour is naturally higher after 37 weeks, or around 32 weeks if you are carrying twins, said the NHS, and that some airlines do not allow expectant mothers to fly after these periods.

It states on its website: “Some airlines won't let you fly towards the end of your pregnancy. Check with the airline for their policy on this," the NHS says on its website.

"After week 28 of pregnancy, the airline may ask for a letter from your doctor or midwife confirming your due date, and that you are not at risk of complications.

"Make sure your travel insurance covers you for any eventuality, such as pregnancy-related medical care during labour, premature birth and the cost of changing the date of your return trip if you go into labour."

Last year, a passenger suddenly went into labour at the departures lounge of London Luton Airport, with airport staff and passing aircraft crew helping with the delivery.