Report: Dwayne Haskins was ‘drinking heavily’ hours before fatal accident

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Former Ohio State and Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Dwayne Haskins had been out at a club and drinking “heavily” just hours before he was struck and killed on a Florida highway earlier this year, according to a toxicology report, The Miami Herald reported on Monday.

The toxicology report stated that Haskins' blood alcohol content was between .20 and .24 when he died, which is up to three times the legal limit in Florida.

Haskins was killed early on April 9 after a dump truck struck him on Interstate 595 near Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Haskins, officials said, was improperly on the roadway and had entered travel lanes into the path of the truck. He was also reportedly hit by a second car after the first impact, and died at the scene.

Officials have not said why Haskins was trying to cross the highway early that morning. Haskins’ wife called 911 from Pittsburgh that morning and told a dispatcher that he said he was walking to get gas. A Steelers official told the medical examiner’s office that Haskins had gone to dinner and then a club with a friend or his cousin the night before he died. They “drank heavily” there before getting into a fight and separating, the report said, via the Herald.

Haskins’ death was ruled accidental. He was 24.

Haskins was a former Heisman Trophy finalist at Ohio State and was selected by the Washington Commanders with the No. 15 overall pick in the 2019 NFL draft. The Steelers signed him before last season.

His wife issued a statement Monday afternoon through her attorney.

"On behalf of Dwayne's wife, his family and his memory, and on behalf of the truth, we respectfully request and pray for privacy, for patience and for the public to withhold any judgement during this period while the law enforcement authorities continue to investigate and conduct their important work," the statement read, in part.

Dwayne Haskins of the Pittsburgh Steelers
Dwayne Haskins' blood alcohol content was between .20 and .24 when he died last month — which is up to three times the legal limit in Florida. (Chris Keane/Getty Images)
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