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Windsor police inspector faces 7 charges of discreditable conduct

Ed Armstrong of the Windsor Police Service upon his promotion to the rank of Staff Sergeant in 2020. (Windsor Police Service - image credit)
Ed Armstrong of the Windsor Police Service upon his promotion to the rank of Staff Sergeant in 2020. (Windsor Police Service - image credit)

A high-ranking member of the Windsor Police Service has been charged with multiple counts of discreditable conduct.

Windsor police announced Wednesday that Insp. Ed Armstrong is facing repercussions under the Police Services Act.

Details have not been released about the specific accusation against Armstrong. Windsor police said it relates to Armstrong being accused of "acting in a manner that has the potential to bring disrepute to and undermine public confidence in the Windsor Police Service."

Insp. Ed Armstrong of Windsor police.
Insp. Ed Armstrong of Windsor police.

Insp. Ed Armstrong of Windsor police. (Windsor Police Service)

Windsor police reportedly learned of allegations of misconduct by Armstrong last year, then requested a comprehensive investigation by Peel Regional Police.

The involvement of an outside organization was necessary "to ensure a transparent and impartial process," Windsor police stated.

The Windsor police professional standards branch confirmed to CBC Windsor that a total of seven discreditable conduct charges have been laid against Armstrong.

Armstrong's Police Services Act hearing will be held on Feb. 12.

According to Windsor police, Armstrong's case is not related to the recent announcement by the province's Special Investigations Unit. The SIU said this week that an unnamed Windsor police officer is the subject of multiple sexual assault allegations dating back to 2011.

Armstrong has been a Windsor police officer for more than 25 years. His decorated career includes 10 years with the Emergency Services Unit — the Windsor police tactical team — including a leadership role on the team.

Armstrong became Windsor's first Black staff sergeant in 2020, and first Black inspector in 2021.

Insp. Ed Armstrong of Windsor police in an image from January 2023.
Insp. Ed Armstrong of Windsor police in an image from January 2023.

Insp. Ed Armstrong of Windsor police in an image from January 2023. (Windsor Police Service)

The status of inspector at WPS is only outranked by superintendents, deputy chiefs, and the chief.

Windsor police said Armstrong is currently reassigned to "alternate duties," pending the outcome of the proceedings under the Police Services Act.

Windsor police said no further comment or information will be released at this time.

Insp. Ed Armstrong of Windsor police (far right) with Chief of Windsor police Jason Bellaire (left), Insp. Marc LeSage of Anishinabek police, and Sgt. Kristina Stannard of Windsor police.
Insp. Ed Armstrong of Windsor police (far right) with Chief of Windsor police Jason Bellaire (left), Insp. Marc LeSage of Anishinabek police, and Sgt. Kristina Stannard of Windsor police.

Insp. Ed Armstrong of Windsor police (far right) with Chief of Windsor police Jason Bellaire (left), Insp. Marc LeSage of Anishinabek police, and Sgt. Kristina Stannard of Windsor police. (Windsor Police Service)

The past year has seen multiple Windsor police officers involved in legal proceedings related to misconduct or worse.

Ontario's SIU disclosed on Tuesday that a Windsor police officer is accused of sexual assaults hat allegedly took place over the course of more than a decade — from 2011 to 2023.

In November 2023, a woman filed a $4.5-million lawsuit against former Windsor police officer Peter Burke — who had a sexual relationship with her in 2017 after meeting her through a domestic violence investigation.

In September 2023, Const. Joshua Smith of Windsor police was arrested and charged with criminal harassment, indecent communications, and harassing communications.

That same month, Sgt. Deler Bal of Windsor police was charged with two counts of assault and one count of assault causing bodily harm in connection with an off-duty physical altercation in a restaurant in Ottawa.

One year ago, on Jan. 7, 2023, Jason Crowley, the service's current deputy chief, was stopped in Amherstburg after his personal vehicle was observed travelling 111 km/h on a 70 km/h roadway.

Despite the vehicle's speed making Crowley eligible for a stunt driving charge, no immediate action was taken in terms of a charge or impounding of his vehicle.

Windsor police disclosed weeks later that Crowley had been issued a summons for stunt driving.

The matter has since been referred to the Ontario Civilian Police Commission for review.